Video from Saturday’s march to end deaths in custody

video from @OccupiedTimes

Extract from opening speech by Minkah Adofo of United Families and Friends Campaign:

“We are here today, at a very minimum, to say that these people, our loved ones, did not die in vain. Second, we are here today to say to the British government that we want justice. And third, we are here to recognise that these killings are not just about isolated officers… they are backed up by the state.

We want everyone to know this is not just an issue that affects the Black community, although we are disproportionately represented… In fact, the majority of the people killed in custody are actually white.

It’s important that you support the campaign, because an important question is raised over these killings, and the question is – what kind of society do we want to live in? It seems very clear to us, that we are living under a police state. Because when the police, and the various agencies of the state can go out and commit these brutal murders and get away with it, it means that none of us are safe.”

Also featured in the video:

  • Marcia Rigg, sister of Sean Rigg
  • Carole Duggan, aunt of Mark Duggan
  • Myrna Simpson, mother of Joy Gardner
  • Ajibola Lewis, mother of Seni Lewis

More coverage:

Screening of Migrant Media’s new film ‘Burn’ this Friday 17 October

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Description:

‘Burn’
(30minutes/UK/2014/Migrant Media)

Collective memory is a fire that never dies.

In August 2011 Britain was on fire – what was the spark that led to the crisis? When Mark Duggan was shot by the police the scene was set for a confrontation but it was not the first time. In this grass-roots documentary we hear why Tottenham burned, show how the flames spread and look at the deep-rooted reasons that have set fires blazing in the last four decades. Four people in this small community, all black and working class, have died at the hands of the police and this film retraces their story. Powerful witness testimonies are balanced against police reaction to the violence that exploded and the film offers a fresh political analysis of the cause of the uprising. Exploring ideas of collective memory ‘Burn’ is poetry for the people.

This event will feature a screening of the new documentary film by Migrant Media, followed by a Q&A with Marcia Rigg (Sister of Sean Rigg), Minkah Adofo (United Families & Friends Campaign) and Director Ken Fero.

 

Event information:

Organised by London Campaign Against Police and State Violence & United Families & Friends Campaign (UFFC)

Lecture Theatre B04, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

Starts 6pm.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/728179040588509/

Tomorrow: Our Conference of Little Rebellions

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One day to go but there is still time to register for our annual conference: The Right To Life: under threat by the state please RSVP LCAPSV (a) GMAIL (dot) com

The social media hashtag we will be asking people to use is #LCAPSV

We have the new addition of Marcia Rigg, who will be speaking about the recent developments regarding her brother, Sean Rigg’s case. We also will be running mini Stop & Search workshops as well as a speak-out session where all participants are invited to share their thoughts and experiences. Also we recognise that this weekend is the Stand Up for Ferguson weekend of action. We will show our solidarity with those fighting police brutality across the United States.

Our conference is about building our solidarity with one another and resisting together. Below is one story of the many rebellions we want to see across London and beyond:


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Annual march against deaths in custody Saturday 25 October

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March with us in solidarity for an end to deaths in custody.

There have been over 3000 deaths in state custody since 1969. There has not been a single successful homicide prosecution, despite evidence of unreasonable force and several unlawful killing inquest verdicts.

Join United Families and Friends Campaign on Saturday 25 October 2014 for their annual rally, protest march and petition submission to 10 Downing Street. Assemble for the rally at 12pm in Trafalgar Square. Please wear black. London Campaign Against Police & State Violence will be there with banners.

‘The Right to Life Under Threat by the State’: join us for our annual conference 12 October

***UPDATE 10/10/2014***

Marcia Rigg of the Sean Rigg Justice Campaign will now be speaking at our conference. This means we will no longer be screening Burn but instead a section of Who Polices the Police which is about her family’s story. People who want to see Burn can come on Friday 17th October to our film screening of Burn with United Families and Friends Campaign at Birkbeck University. More details on Facebook.

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London Campaign Against Police and State Violence will be holding our annual conference on the theme of ‘The Right to Life Under Threat by the State’. Everyone is welcome, and admission is free (but donations are welcome).

The full programme will be published shortly. The conference will feature:

Richard Hoggart Building Cinema, Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths (University of London), Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW

Registration 1pm.

Facebook event is here.

Please RSVP by emailing lcapsv (a) gmail . com

Stand with the family of Azelle Rodney – Wednesday 10 Sept, 9am

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Wednesday 10th September at 9am
Westminster Magistrates’ Court
181 Marylebone Road,
London NW1 5BR

On Wednesday 10 September 9am at Westminster Magistrates Court, “E7”, the officer charged with the murder of Azelle Rodney will be appearing in court. The family have asked for support in having a peaceful and dignified presence outside the court.

The family have asked please don’t use the words “murderer”, “killer” or any other inflammatory language on any placards or banners as this could harm the prosecution’s case.

Please join this Facebook event, and share.

Supporting a victim of police brutality – update on D’s case

D, a black man assaulted by police in Brixton in June this year, appeared in court for a case management hearing on Tuesday 2 September. His supporters and members of LCAPSV maintained a presence in the public gallery and outside the court throughout the proceedings. D’s case has been scheduled for 5 January, and we will be there to stand in solidarity with him as he faces charges of obstruction of a police officer.

Please join this Facebook event, and share.

Support a Black Man whose ribs were cracked by Territorial Support Group

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Tuesday 2nd September 2014, 09.30am

Venue:
Inner London Crown Court
Newington Causeway
SE1 6AZ
nearest stations: Elephant & Castle, Borough

FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/941431605882452/

On Monday 23rd June 2014, D, a black man from Brixton, was assaulted by police officers from the Territorial Support Group. The officers had seen D stop his car moments earlier to speak to his Uncle, and chose to interpret this chance family encounter as something sinister. In the course of a “search” they attacked D and his cousin, a passenger in the car, kicking D multiple times when he had already voluntarily gone to the floor and put his hands out to be cuffed. D was arrested, strip searched, and held in Brixton police station for almost 24 hours. The police attack left him with bruises and a cracked rib. (More details here)

When the police were unable to find anything illegal on D that could possibly justify the search, let alone their violent attack, they charged him with assault on a police officer. This has now been reduced to “obstructing a constable during a drug search,” a lesser charge but one which still carries a possible unlimited fine and 2 years of imprisonment.

D would greatly appreciate your support at his next case management hearing, at Inner London Crown Court on 2nd September at 9.30am. We will meet outside the court with banners, and will be present in the public gallery during the hearing. We must let the police and Crown Prosecution Service know that we are watching them in D’s case, and in every other instance of police brutality in London!

A’s case adjourned again – a brutal form of punishment in itself

On the 14 August, LCAPSV attended City of London Magistrates court to support A, a member of the campaign, at her latest court hearing for the charge of ‘willful obstruction of the highway’. This charge dates from January of this year, when A was arrested while peacefully protesting outside Downing Street and imprisoned for four days.

A was expecting to be formally tried at this hearing, the previous hearing on the 31 July having been adjourned due to the Crown Prosecution Service’s failure to disclose the necessary evidence to A’s legal team. However, once again, the CPS had failed to comply with the court’s directions and disclosed crucial evidence only once the trial had begun, leaving A and her legal team no time to examine the evidence before the proceedings began. Furthermore, when the CPS eventually handed over the relevant CCTV evidence – some 35 minutes into the hearing – it emerged that an important twenty minutes of footage were missing, for which the responsible police officer had no adequate explanation. As such, the case was adjourned until the 9th December. This means that A’s case will drag on for 11 months. This stretching out of the legal proceedings constitutes a brutal form of punishment in and of itself, as the mental and physical strain such a process puts on people is immense.

In spite of all of this, A is resolute and remains determined to fight against her racist criminalisation. LCAPSV will continue to support A in every way we can and will be in court supporting her on the 9th December. More details will follow closer to the time.

Crown Prosecution Service – charge the killers now!

On 6 August, we stood in solidarity with the family members of Sean Rigg, Habib Ullah, Leon Patterson and many others as they called on the Crown Prosecution Service to deliver justice.  The United Families and Friends campaign is a coalition of those affected by deaths in police, prison and psychiatric custody. UFFC said:

The Crown Prosecution Service is charged with inaction. Last week charges were brought against the officer who shot dead Azelle Rodney in 2005. Why did his mother, Susan Alexander, have to wait nine years for that officer to be charged?

Many other families whose loved ones died in custody, are still waiting for the CPS to make a decision. The standard response in recent years has been ‘ not enough evidence to prosecute’ – but this is not good enough.

Crown Prosecution Service – charge the killers now!

You can see pictures from the picket by clicking the Storify link below: