Supporting a victim of police brutality – update on D’s case

http://octaviusbearslair.com/?page_id=10 D, a black man assaulted by police in Brixton in June this year, appeared in court for a case management hearing on Tuesday 2 September. His supporters and members of LCAPSV maintained a presence in the public gallery and outside the court throughout the proceedings. D’s case has been scheduled for 5 January, and we will be there to stand in solidarity with him as he faces charges of obstruction of a police officer.

Please join this Facebook event, and share.

Support a Black Man whose ribs were cracked by Territorial Support Group

lamictal zyprexa 5mg police-brutality-pic2

Tuesday 2nd September 2014, 09.30am

Venue:
Inner London Crown Court
Newington Causeway
SE1 6AZ
nearest stations: Elephant & Castle, Borough

FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/941431605882452/

On Monday 23rd June 2014, D, a black man from Brixton, was assaulted by police officers from the Territorial Support Group. The officers had seen D stop his car moments earlier to speak to his Uncle, and chose to interpret this chance family encounter as something sinister. In the course of a “search” they attacked D and his cousin, a passenger in the car, kicking D multiple times when he had already voluntarily gone to the floor and put his hands out to be cuffed. D was arrested, strip searched, and held in Brixton police station for almost 24 hours. The police attack left him with bruises and a cracked rib. (More details here)

When the police were unable to find anything illegal on D that could possibly justify the search, let alone their violent attack, they charged him with assault on a police officer. This has now been reduced to “obstructing a constable during a drug search,” a lesser charge but one which still carries a possible unlimited fine and 2 years of imprisonment.

D would greatly appreciate your support at his next case management hearing, at Inner London Crown Court on 2nd September at 9.30am. We will meet outside the court with banners, and will be present in the public gallery during the hearing. We must let the police and Crown Prosecution Service know that we are watching them in D’s case, and in every other instance of police brutality in London!

A’s case adjourned again – a brutal form of punishment in itself

On the 14 August, LCAPSV attended City of London Magistrates court to support A, a member of the campaign, at her latest court hearing for the charge of ‘willful obstruction of the highway’. This charge dates from January of this year, when A was arrested while peacefully protesting outside Downing Street and imprisoned for four days.

A was expecting to be formally tried at this hearing, the previous hearing on the 31 July having been adjourned due to the Crown Prosecution Service’s failure to disclose the necessary evidence to A’s legal team. However, once again, the CPS had failed to comply with the court’s directions and disclosed crucial evidence only once the trial had begun, leaving A and her legal team no time to examine the evidence before the proceedings began. Furthermore, when the CPS eventually handed over the relevant CCTV evidence – some 35 minutes into the hearing – it emerged that an important twenty minutes of footage were missing, for which the responsible police officer had no adequate explanation. As such, the case was adjourned until the 9th December. This means that A’s case will drag on for 11 months. This stretching out of the legal proceedings constitutes a brutal form of punishment in and of itself, as the mental and physical strain such a process puts on people is immense.

In spite of all of this, A is resolute and remains determined to fight against her racist criminalisation. LCAPSV will continue to support A in every way we can and will be in court supporting her on the 9th December. More details will follow closer to the time.

Call out to support A, a victim of brutal and racist policing

lcapsv_bannerWHERE: City of London Magistrates court, 1 Queen Victoria St, London EC4N 4XY

DATE: 14 August 2014

TIME: 9AM

A, a black woman, was arrested in January as she held a peaceful protest outside Downing Street against state racism. She was imprisoned for four days, and also denied her basic rights including access to legal representation and contact with family and friends. A feels strongly that the treatment she experienced was because she is black. When she was eventually released A was charged with ‘willful obstruction of the highway’. Details about her ordeal have been provided by A, below.

A attended court on 31 July – but due to the incompetence of the CPS and the police, the trial did not go ahead on that date. The CPS had not provided the necessary evidence, the cops were late and when they did eventually show up, one of them contradicted his own witness statement. This means that A has been subjected to a further two weeks’ wait.

We are calling on our supporters to stand with A as she attends court.

I was protesting peacefully outside Downing Street for a month in the cold during winter 2013 with an Art placard about racism and Institutional racism and the impact of this on Black women and families.

I was arrested there on 6th January 2014.

I was refused a solicitor. I was refused any call to family or friends to my embassy . I was locked up and hidden from the world for four complete days. I was brutalised and attacked and falsely imprisoned by Police officers. I went on hunger and water strike and refused their water or food for the four days. They denied me the right to contact the Consular/ Embassy for support. I believe that any English person arrested abroad or any other white citizen is never treated in this appalling and inhumane way, and I believe they would be able to contact their Embassy right away. I am an Afrikan woman, a mother, a qualified teacher and I am determined to fight for my rights.

The Metropolitan police officers accused me of refusing to leave Downing Street; of being inside a car and of trying to break some doors outside Downing Street corridor. So the racist police sent me to jail and molested and assaulted me. And standing up for my rights and fighting for justice to them meant that I was mad and they wanted to commit me to a psychiatric institution. It is pertinent to say that I do not own any car and I have never in my life driven inside any car in Downing Street. My experience has shown me that what matters to racist Police Officer is that you are black and they are unleashing their bestial brutalities against Africans when they are on duty. Sex, Age, nationality, education, religion etc doesn’t matter when you are African and there is nothing in place to protect you.

I am inviting you to our Campaign outside the tribunal and to explore with others how we can organize ourselves pacifically and rally together to fight against Institutional Racism practices. I will always refuse to surrender to injustice and to State lies, violence and to let others design a future based on sustained discrimination and racism against Africans.

September 4th: Defend a Black Man Brutally Attacked By Armed Police

On 1st of June, Hasani and Asanti Williams, two black men were violently attacked by armed officers in Woolwich while driving home. At no time did the officers identify themselves. Instead they smashed the windows of their car, shot out its tires, and proceeded to beat both men with their guns, causing serious injuries to both brothers. Once out of the car, both Hasani and Asanti were subject to racist abuse and continued and prolonged assault, as well as tasering. At no point had either brother shown any sign resistance or attempt to fight back.

Asanti was taken to hospital and eventually released without charge or any explanation for what had happened. Hasani was arrested and taken to a police station where he was falsely charged with drug possession, for an item that had been planted on him by one of the armed officers. While in the station Hasani was denied a phone-call and surreptitiously refused his right to a lawyer or medical attention. Both men are still dealing with the emotional and physical damage that this racist police attack has inflicted on them and their family.

The police are now attempting to prosecute Hasani for a minor charge of possession, taking him to Crown Court for an offence that would usually result in a caution. This is their desperate attempt to justify the unjustifiable brutality of their attack on these brothers. Hasani’s case is being prosecuted at Woolwich Crown Court. We remember unprovoked police violence towards Jean Charles De Menezes, Mauro Demetrio, Mark Duggan, Ian Tomlinson and many others. We ask that all who are concerned about police brutality join this demonstration.

We demand justice for Hasani and Asanti!

Hasani has asked for people to come to the court from 9 to protest police violence, and offer moral support and friendly faces in the court.

Come to support him at Woolwich Crown Court, next door to HMP Belmarsh, Weston Way, Thamesmead, London, SE28 0EB. Buses to the venue are: 244, 380, 672, 472. 177 is a walking distance away. A map can be found on the following link:

http://www.tfl.gov.uk/tfl/gettingaround/maps/buses/

Train stations are: Woolwich Arsenal DLR and Plumstead Rail Station

Facebook event page can be found here.